History of the Archdiocesan Seminaries of Cebu

A Brief History of the Archdiocesan Seminaries of Cebu: The Main Venue of the IEC 2016

Seminario Mayor de San Carlos, as it is known today, began as a small mission school named Colegio de San Ildefonso, attached to a Jesuit House established in Cebu by Padre Antonio Sedeño in 1595. The Colegio’s operation was interrupted in 1767 when the Jesuits were expelled from all Spanish territories. The Jesuits left Cebu and the Colegio de San Ildefonso formally closed on 1 June 1769.

Bishop Mateo Joaquin Rubio de Arevalo petitioned to the King of Spain to grant him the old Jesuit Colegio to be used as a diocesan seminary. The King granted de Arevalo’s request on 1779 and established the Real Seminario de San Carlos, named in honor of St. Charles Borromeo, the patron of King Charles III.

On March 2, 1863, Bishop Jimeno of Cebu wrote a letter to the Father-General of the Padres Paules requesting them to send priests for the administration of the seminary of his diocese. On the 23rd of July 1867, the Seminario Conciliar de San Carlos was formally turned over to the Vincentian Fathers.

In 1924, following Pius XI’s Officiorum Omnium, the the Seminario-Colegio became two separate institutions, a Colegio for the lay students and a Seminario exclusively for those training for the priesthood, both under the Vincentian administration. On 1 April 1935, the Vincentians formally turned over the administration of the Colegio de San Carlos to the Fathers of the Society of the Divine Word (SVD) in order for Vincentians to fully concentrate on the training of aspiring priests.

During the outbreak of the Second World War, the Padres Paules retreated to the hills of Dalaguete, Cebu. Classes resumed in the parish convent of Argao for the menores or high school seminarians and in a rented house in Sibonga for the mayores or those seminarians studying in Philosophy and Theology. Due to the heavy aerial bombing of the war, the historical building of the Seminario de San Carlos was bombed out of existence in 1945.

After the war, then Cebu Archbishop Gabriel Reyes saw the need for a new seminary compound to replace the one destroyed during the war. Hence, on September 1949, the Seminario de San Carlos that housed both the menores and the mayores seminarians now had a new neo-classical home along the street of San Jose de la Montaña (later renamed Pope John Paul II Avenue).

In 1952, the Seminario Menor de San Carlos, still under the Padres Paules was established for high school seminarians. In 14 July 1969, the minor seminary was turned over to the diocesan administration and renamed Pope John XXIII Seminary. Later on, in 1971 the San Carlos Seminary College was formally inaugurated with Msgr. Alfeo Manalili as the first Rector.

The Seminario Mayor de San Carlos was administered by the Spanish Padres Paules until 1973 when Father Jesus Dosado (later Archbishop of Ozamis) was appointed as its first Filipino Rector. On March 21, 1998, the Vincentian Fathers ̶  represented by its last rector, Fr. Manuel Ginete, CM ̶  turned over administration of the seminary to the Diocesan Clergy of Cebu.A Brief History of the Archdiocesan Seminaries of Cebu: The Main Venue of the IEC 2016

Seminario Mayor de San Carlos, as it is known today began as a small mission school named Colegio de San Ildefonso, attached to a Jesuit House established in Cebu by Padre Antonio Sedeño in 1595. The Colegio’s operation was interrupted in 1767 when the Jesuits were expelled from all Spainsh territories. The Jeusits left Cebu and the Colegio de San Ildefonso formally closed on 1 June 1769.

Bishop Mateo Joaquin Rubio de Arevalo, petitioned to the King of Spain to grant him the old Jesuit Colegio to be used as a diocesan seminary. The King granted de Arevalo’s request on 1779 and established the Real Seminario de San Carlos, named in honor of St. Charles Borromeo, the patron of King Chales III.

On 2 March 1863, Bishop Jimeno of Cebu wrote a letter to the Father-General of the Padres Paules requesting to send priests for the administration of the seminary of his diocese. On 23 July of 1867 the Seminario Conciliar de San Carlos was formally turned over to the Vincentian Fathers.

In 1924, following Pius XI’s Officiorum Omnium, the the Seminario-Colegio became two separate institutions, a Colegio for the lay students and a Seminario exclusively for those training for the priesthood, both under by the Vincentian administration. On 1 April 1935, the Vincentians formally turned over the administration of the Colegio de San Carlos to the Fathers of the Society of the Divine Word (SVD) in order for them to fully concentrate on the training of aspiring priests.

During the outbreak of the Second World War, the Padres Paules retreated to the hills of Dalaguete, Cebu. Classes resumed in the parish convent of Argao for the menores or high school seminarians and in a rented house in Sibonga for the mayores or those seminarians studying in Philosophy and Theology. Due to the heavy aerial bombing of the war, the historical building of Seminario de San Carlos was bombed out of existence in 1945.

After the war, then Cebu Archbishop Gabriel Reyes saw the need for a new seminary compound to repalce the one destroyed during the war. Hence, on September 1949, the Seminario de San Carlos that housed both the menores and the mayores seminarians now had a new neo-classical home along the street of San Jose de la Montaña (later renamed Pope John Paul II Ave.)

In 1952, the Seminario Menor de San Carlos, still under the Padres Paules was establshed for high school seminarians. In 14 July 1969, the minor seminary was turned over to the diocesan administration and renamed Pope John XXIII Seminary. Later on, in 1971 the San Carlos Seminary College was formally inaugurated with Msgr. Alfeo Manalili as first Rector.

The Seminario Mayor de San Carlos was administered by the Spanish Padres Paules until 1973 when Father Jesus Dosado (later Archbishop of Ozamis) was appointed as the first Filipino Rector. On 21 March 1998, the Vincentian Fathers, represented by its last rector, Fr. Manuel Ginete, CM turned over administration of the seminary to the Diocesan Clergy of Cebu.A Brief History of the Archdiocesan Seminaries of Cebu: The Main Venue of the IEC 2016

Seminario Mayor de San Carlos, as it is known today began as a small mission school named Colegio de San Ildefonso, attached to a Jesuit House established in Cebu by Padre Antonio Sedeño in 1595. The Colegio’s operation was interrupted in 1767 when the Jesuits were expelled from all Spainsh territories. The Jeusits left Cebu and the Colegio de San Ildefonso formally closed on 1 June 1769.

Bishop Mateo Joaquin Rubio de Arevalo, petitioned to the King of Spain to grant him the old Jesuit Colegio to be used as a diocesan seminary. The King granted de Arevalo’s request on 1779 and established the Real Seminario de San Carlos, named in honor of St. Charles Borromeo, the patron of King Chales III.

On 2 March 1863, Bishop Jimeno of Cebu wrote a letter to the Father-General of the Padres Paules requesting to send priests for the administration of the seminary of his diocese. On 23 July of 1867 the Seminario Conciliar de San Carlos was formally turned over to the Vincentian Fathers.

In 1924, following Pius XI’s Officiorum Omnium, the the Seminario-Colegio became two separate institutions, a Colegio for the lay students and a Seminario exclusively for those training for the priesthood, both under by the Vincentian administration. On 1 April 1935, the Vincentians formally turned over the administration of the Colegio de San Carlos to the Fathers of the Society of the Divine Word (SVD) in order for them to fully concentrate on the training of aspiring priests.

During the outbreak of the Second World War, the Padres Paules retreated to the hills of Dalaguete, Cebu. Classes resumed in the parish convent of Argao for the menores or high school seminarians and in a rented house in Sibonga for the mayores or those seminarians studying in Philosophy and Theology. Due to the heavy aerial bombing of the war, the historical building of Seminario de San Carlos was bombed out of existence in 1945.

After the war, then Cebu Archbishop Gabriel Reyes saw the need for a new seminary compound to repalce the one destroyed during the war. Hence, on September 1949, the Seminario de San Carlos that housed both the menores and the mayores seminarians now had a new neo-classical home along the street of San Jose de la Montaña (later renamed Pope John Paul II Ave.)

In 1952, the Seminario Menor de San Carlos, still under the Padres Paules was establshed for high school seminarians. In 14 July 1969, the minor seminary was turned over to the diocesan administration and renamed Pope John XXIII Seminary. Later on, in 1971 the San Carlos Seminary College was formally inaugurated with Msgr. Alfeo Manalili as first Rector.

The Seminario Mayor de San Carlos was administered by the Spanish Padres Paules until 1973 when Father Jesus Dosado (later Archbishop of Ozamis) was appointed as the first Filipino Rector. On 21 March 1998, the Vincentian Fathers, represented by its last rector, Fr. Manuel Ginete, CM turned over administration of the seminary to the Diocesan Clergy of Cebu.A Brief History of the Archdiocesan Seminaries of Cebu: The Main Venue of the IEC 2016

Seminario Mayor de San Carlos, as it is known today began as a small mission school named Colegio de San Ildefonso, attached to a Jesuit House established in Cebu by Padre Antonio Sedeño in 1595. The Colegio’s operation was interrupted in 1767 when the Jesuits were expelled from all Spainsh territories. The Jeusits left Cebu and the Colegio de San Ildefonso formally closed on 1 June 1769.

Bishop Mateo Joaquin Rubio de Arevalo, petitioned to the King of Spain to grant him the old Jesuit Colegio to be used as a diocesan seminary. The King granted de Arevalo’s request on 1779 and established the Real Seminario de San Carlos, named in honor of St. Charles Borromeo, the patron of King Chales III.

On 2 March 1863, Bishop Jimeno of Cebu wrote a letter to the Father-General of the Padres Paules requesting to send priests for the administration of the seminary of his diocese. On 23 July of 1867 the Seminario Conciliar de San Carlos was formally turned over to the Vincentian Fathers.

In 1924, following Pius XI’s Officiorum Omnium, the the Seminario-Colegio became two separate institutions, a Colegio for the lay students and a Seminario exclusively for those training for the priesthood, both under by the Vincentian administration. On 1 April 1935, the Vincentians formally turned over the administration of the Colegio de San Carlos to the Fathers of the Society of the Divine Word (SVD) in order for them to fully concentrate on the training of aspiring priests.

During the outbreak of the Second World War, the Padres Paules retreated to the hills of Dalaguete, Cebu. Classes resumed in the parish convent of Argao for the menores or high school seminarians and in a rented house in Sibonga for the mayores or those seminarians studying in Philosophy and Theology. Due to the heavy aerial bombing of the war, the historical building of Seminario de San Carlos was bombed out of existence in 1945.

After the war, then Cebu Archbishop Gabriel Reyes saw the need for a new seminary compound to repalce the one destroyed during the war. Hence, on September 1949, the Seminario de San Carlos that housed both the menores and the mayores seminarians now had a new neo-classical home along the street of San Jose de la Montaña (later renamed Pope John Paul II Ave.)

In 1952, the Seminario Menor de San Carlos, still under the Padres Paules was establshed for high school seminarians. In 14 July 1969, the minor seminary was turned over to the diocesan administration and renamed Pope John XXIII Seminary. Later on, in 1971 the San Carlos Seminary College was formally inaugurated with Msgr. Alfeo Manalili as first Rector.

The Seminario Mayor de San Carlos was administered by the Spanish Padres Paules until 1973 when Father Jesus Dosado (later Archbishop of Ozamis) was appointed as the first Filipino Rector. On 21 March 1998, the Vincentian Fathers, represented by its last rector, Fr. Manuel Ginete, CM turned over administration of the seminary to the Diocesan Clergy of Cebu.A Brief History of the Archdiocesan Seminaries of Cebu: The Main Venue of the IEC 2016

Seminario Mayor de San Carlos, as it is known today began as a small mission school named Colegio de San Ildefonso, attached to a Jesuit House established in Cebu by Padre Antonio Sedeño in 1595. The Colegio’s operation was interrupted in 1767 when the Jesuits were expelled from all Spainsh territories. The Jeusits left Cebu and the Colegio de San Ildefonso formally closed on 1 June 1769.

Bishop Mateo Joaquin Rubio de Arevalo, petitioned to the King of Spain to grant him the old Jesuit Colegio to be used as a diocesan seminary. The King granted de Arevalo’s request on 1779 and established the Real Seminario de San Carlos, named in honor of St. Charles Borromeo, the patron of King Chales III.

On 2 March 1863, Bishop Jimeno of Cebu wrote a letter to the Father-General of the Padres Paules requesting to send priests for the administration of the seminary of his diocese. On 23 July of 1867 the Seminario Conciliar de San Carlos was formally turned over to the Vincentian Fathers.

In 1924, following Pius XI’s Officiorum Omnium, the the Seminario-Colegio became two separate institutions, a Colegio for the lay students and a Seminario exclusively for those training for the priesthood, both under by the Vincentian administration. On 1 April 1935, the Vincentians formally turned over the administration of the Colegio de San Carlos to the Fathers of the Society of the Divine Word (SVD) in order for them to fully concentrate on the training of aspiring priests.

During the outbreak of the Second World War, the Padres Paules retreated to the hills of Dalaguete, Cebu. Classes resumed in the parish convent of Argao for the menores or high school seminarians and in a rented house in Sibonga for the mayores or those seminarians studying in Philosophy and Theology. Due to the heavy aerial bombing of the war, the historical building of Seminario de San Carlos was bombed out of existence in 1945.

After the war, then Cebu Archbishop Gabriel Reyes saw the need for a new seminary compound to repalce the one destroyed during the war. Hence, on September 1949, the Seminario de San Carlos that housed both the menores and the mayores seminarians now had a new neo-classical home along the street of San Jose de la Montaña (later renamed Pope John Paul II Ave.)

In 1952, the Seminario Menor de San Carlos, still under the Padres Paules was establshed for high school seminarians. In 14 July 1969, the minor seminary was turned over to the diocesan administration and renamed Pope John XXIII Seminary. Later on, in 1971 the San Carlos Seminary College was formally inaugurated with Msgr. Alfeo Manalili as first Rector.

The Seminario Mayor de San Carlos was administered by the Spanish Padres Paules until 1973 when Father Jesus Dosado (later Archbishop of Ozamis) was appointed as the first Filipino Rector. On 21 March 1998, the Vincentian Fathers, represented by its last rector, Fr. Manuel Ginete, CM turned over administration of the seminary to the Diocesan Clergy of Cebu.

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